One of the biggest challenges in investing in the stock market is picking the best stocks. In my book, "The Confident Investor" I teach my readers how to pick Good Companies. This page is designed to show the raw performance of these companies. It is not designed to show my personal portfolio, which may or may not exceed the performance stated here. Since I use the trading system described in my book, you can assume that I beat the performance recorded here.

I have created three tables below. The first table is the general market - NASDAQ and S&P500. Every investor should try to beat the average of these two indexes. In this report, my larger Watch List beats this metric easily.

I must caution you, I do not actually propose that you "buy and hold" any given stock, but rather you should "buy to hold" the stock. My investing technique teaches you to efficiently move your money to the stocks that are currently increasing in value the most. I use my Watch List for this work, these are Good Companies that I wait for great buying opportunities. This strategy is well described in my book, "The Confident Investor" and tends to be a very safe strategy in bear markets while typically still providing above market returns in a bull or flat market.

My Short Term Watch List are 15 companies that are hot right now. I select this list every quarter. I evenly divide a portion of my portfolio among these 15 companies. The next quarter, I add or delete companies as necessary and then re-balance the portfolio. This tends to be a more risky strategy because I don't bail out on bad stock movement (at least until the end of the quarter). In a bull market or a flat market, these very well-run and high-performing companies tend to beat the general market by a significant margin.

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You can purchase my book wherever books are sold such as Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Books A Million. It is available in paperback as well as e-book formats for Nook, Kindle, and iPad.

Stock Indexes Performance

 

1 week ago 1 month ago 1 quarter ago 1 year ago
Index Close Profit % Close Profit % Close Profit % Close Profit
^GSPC $2,378.25 -1.44% $2,367.34 -0.99% $2,263.79 3.54% $2,035.94 15.13%
^IXIC $5,901.00 -1.22% $5,845.31 -0.28% $5,462.69 6.70% $4,773.50 22.11%

Week average for Indexes: -1.33%
Month average for Indexes: -0.64%
Quarter average for Indexes: 5.12%
Year average for Indexes: 18.62%

Watch List Performance

 

1 week ago 1 month ago 1 quarter ago 1 year ago
Stock Close Profit % Close Profit % Close Profit % Close Profit
AAPL $139.99 0.46% $136.66 2.91% $116.02 21.22% $103.48 35.91%
ABMD $123.97 0.74% $117.14 6.62% $112.38 11.13% $90.60 37.85%
ALGN $111.85 1.81% $102.89 10.67% $98.50 15.60% $70.23 62.14%
ALXN $122.08 -2.31% $131.54 -9.34% $127.19 -6.23% $133.19 -10.46%
AMAT $39.28 -0.79% $36.30 7.36% $32.81 18.79% $19.87 96.10%
AMZN $852.31 -0.79% $845.24 0.04% $760.59 11.18% $582.95 45.06%
AYI $208.34 -4.00% $218.13 -8.31% $234.77 -14.81% $214.44 -6.74%
AZPN $59.37 -3.54% $58.37 -1.88% $54.24 5.59% $34.90 64.10%
BABA $105.61 2.30% $102.95 4.94% $86.79 24.48% $75.86 42.42%
BWLD $152.95 -3.07% $153.20 -3.23% $160.10 -7.40% $144.84 2.35%
CBPO $100.81 -1.29% $109.10 -8.79% $111.28 -10.58% $110.30 -9.78%
COF $88.23 -5.02% $92.61 -9.51% $89.27 -6.13% $68.25 22.78%
CRUS $58.43 2.79% $55.66 7.91% $58.68 2.35% $34.47 74.24%
CVCO $116.75 -0.77% $115.30 0.48% $102.00 13.58% $89.03 30.12%
DPZ $184.83 -1.02% $185.82 -1.55% $161.17 13.51% $127.41 43.59%
EW $94.40 1.26% $94.76 0.88% $93.00 2.78% $87.34 9.45%
EXR $75.36 -0.42% $78.66 -4.60% $73.98 1.43% $86.55 -13.30%
FB $139.84 0.36% $135.44 3.62% $117.27 19.67% $113.05 24.14%
GOOGL $872.37 -4.27% $847.81 -1.49% $807.80 3.38% $754.84 10.64%
GTN $13.65 2.56% $13.35 4.87% $10.90 28.44% $11.50 21.74%
GWR $68.71 -5.15% $74.31 -12.30% $69.90 -6.77% $62.66 4.01%
HDSN $6.47 1.70% $7.16 -8.10% $7.35 -10.48% $3.42 92.40%
HOG $62.25 -3.29% $56.56 6.44% $57.81 4.13% $46.59 29.20%
HSKA $93.11 6.03% $81.38 21.31% $72.21 36.71% $28.38 247.85%
HZO $22.45 -5.12% $22.70 -6.17% $19.30 10.36% $18.57 14.70%
LNCE $40.56 -1.75% $39.66 0.48% $38.13 4.50% $30.18 32.02%
LULU $64.04 -0.55% $65.32 -2.50% $64.41 -1.12% $60.89 4.60%
MCK $147.93 -1.55% $150.57 -3.28% $140.92 3.34% $156.22 -6.78%
MEI $46.30 -3.89% $42.20 5.45% $42.26 5.31% $27.31 62.95%
MET $53.36 -2.53% $52.49 -0.91% $54.03 -3.74% $40.87 27.26%
MIDD $139.35 -2.17% $139.05 -1.96% $130.43 4.52% $103.13 32.19%
MNST $46.47 1.01% $43.55 7.78% $45.57 3.01% $43.75 7.29%
MRK $63.90 -1.13% $65.69 -3.82% $59.13 6.84% $51.49 22.71%
NFLX $145.11 -2.13% $143.25 -0.86% $125.59 13.08% $98.36 44.39%
NVDA $106.07 1.32% $101.46 5.92% $109.64 -1.98% $34.23 213.94%
PCLN $1,772.63 -1.10% $1,631.62 7.45% $1,486.20 17.96% $1,301.19 34.73%
REGN $380.29 -1.92% $361.01 3.32% $381.78 -2.30% $370.80 0.59%
SAM $149.40 -0.20% $159.20 -6.34% $169.60 -12.09% $184.35 -19.12%
SBUX $55.78 1.85% $57.48 -1.17% $56.75 0.10% $57.43 -1.08%
STZ $161.75 1.43% $158.85 3.28% $150.39 9.09% $148.39 10.56%
SUI $80.55 0.01% $83.52 -3.54% $74.49 8.15% $65.79 22.44%
SWKS $97.93 -0.64% $94.70 2.75% $77.80 25.07% $75.06 29.63%
THRM $38.10 -3.54% $36.55 0.55% $35.05 4.85% $39.76 -7.57%
TMO $157.89 -2.44% $158.83 -3.02% $141.71 8.70% $138.47 11.25%
TRN $27.38 -5.51% $27.35 -5.41% $28.62 -9.60% $18.16 42.46%
UA $18.08 0.44% $19.83 -8.42% $25.23 -28.02% $40.58 -55.25%
ULTA $288.81 -2.52% $276.33 1.88% $256.86 9.60% $191.76 46.81%

Week average for Watch List stocks: -1.03% compared to indexes for same period at: -1.33%
Month average for Watch List stocks: 0.01% compared to indexes for same period at: -0.64%
Quarter average for Watch List stocks: 5.26% compared to indexes for same period at: 5.12%
Year average for Watch List stocks: 32.48% compared to indexes for same period at: 18.62%

Short Term Watch List

 

1 week ago 1 month ago 1 quarter ago 1 year ago
Stock Close Profit % Close Profit % Close Profit % Close Profit
ABMD $123.97 0.74% $117.14 6.62% $112.38 11.13% $90.60 37.85%
ALGN $111.85 1.81% $102.89 10.67% $98.50 15.60% $70.23 62.14%
AMAT $39.28 -0.79% $36.30 7.36% $32.81 18.79% $19.87 96.10%
AMZN $852.31 -0.79% $845.24 0.04% $760.59 11.18% $582.95 45.06%
AYI $208.34 -4.00% $218.13 -8.31% $234.77 -14.81% $214.44 -6.74%
CBPO $100.81 -1.29% $109.10 -8.79% $111.28 -10.58% $110.30 -9.78%
CRUS $58.43 2.79% $55.66 7.91% $58.68 2.35% $34.47 74.24%
DPZ $184.83 -1.02% $185.82 -1.55% $161.17 13.51% $127.41 43.59%
EW $94.40 1.26% $94.76 0.88% $93.00 2.78% $87.34 9.45%
HDSN $6.47 1.70% $7.16 -8.10% $7.35 -10.48% $3.42 92.40%
HSKA $93.11 6.03% $81.38 21.31% $72.21 36.71% $28.38 247.85%
NVDA $106.07 1.32% $101.46 5.92% $109.64 -1.98% $34.23 213.94%
STZ $161.75 1.43% $158.85 3.28% $150.39 9.09% $148.39 10.56%
SUI $80.55 0.01% $83.52 -3.54% $74.49 8.15% $65.79 22.44%
ULTA $288.81 -2.52% $276.33 1.88% $256.86 9.60% $191.76 46.81%

Week average for Short Term Watch List stocks: 0.45% compared to indexes for same period at: -1.33%
Month average for Short Term Watch List stocks: 2.37% compared to indexes for same period at: -0.64%
Quarter average for Short Term Watch List stocks: 6.74% compared to indexes for same period at: 5.12%
Year average for Short Term Watch List stocks: 65.73% compared to indexes for same period at: 18.62%

Total Execution Time: 54.678937911987 Sec

This information was calculated on Mar 26, 2017 and is based on the closing value of the most recent trading day which may not be today.
This information is based on the Yahoo Historical Pricing and is only as good or as current as that data.
My Short Term Watch List (including $HSKA) grew by 65.73% over the last year

My Watch List (including $NFLX) grew by 32.48% over the last year

My Short Term Watch List (including $SUI) grew by 65.73% over the last year

NVIDIA Corporation [stckqut]NVDA[/stckqut] is driven by "specialized computing," that is, the transforming of specific software tasks into physical silicon chips instead of depending on an ever-faster do-it-all CPU, or central processing unit. It has existed in some form or another for decades, but it has lately become the driving force behind pretty much everything cool in technology, from artificial intelligence to self-driving cars. Why? Because those CPUs aren't getting faster at the pace they once were. Moore's Law is dying.

Moore's Law is the notion that, every two years or so, the number of transistors in a chip doubles. Its popular conception is that computers keep getting faster, smaller and more power-efficient. That isn't happening the way it used to. "It's not like Moore's Law is going to hit a brick wall -- it's going to kind of sputter to an end," says Daniel Reed, chair of computational science and bioinformatics at the University of Iowa.

As Intel and the other chip foundries spend fortunes to keep the wheel turning, chip designers across the industry are finding creative ways to continue at the old pace of Moore's Law, and in many cases increase device performance even more quickly.

"Most of the advances today come from [chip] design and software," says Nvidia chief scientist William Dally. "For us it's been a challenge because we feel under a lot of pressure to constantly deliver twice the performance per generation," he adds. So far, Nvidia has accomplished that cadence even when the size of the elements on the chip doesn't change, and the only thing that does is its design, or "architecture."

Here's a less-than-exhaustive list of all the applications to which the principle of specialized computing has been applied: Artificial intelligence, image recognition, self-driving cars, virtual reality, bitcoin mining, drones, data centers, even photography. Pretty much every technology company that makes hardware or supplies it -- including Apple, Samsung, Amazon, Qualcomm, Nvidia, Broadcom, Intel, Huawei and Xiaomi -- is exploiting this phenomenon. Even companies that only produce chips for their own use, including Microsoft, Google, and Facebook, are doing it.

Many years ago, almost all computing was done with the CPU, one thing after another in sequence, says Keith Kressin, a senior vice president at Qualcomm. Gradually, often-used but processor-intensive tasks were diverted to specialized chips. Those tasks were processed in parallel, while the CPU did only what was absolutely required.

These task-focused chips come in a wide variety, reflecting the breadth of their uses, and the lines between them can be blurry. One kind, the graphics processing unit -- think Nvidia and gamers -- found wider use for tasks to which it's uniquely suited, including artificial intelligence. Later on, the rise of smartphones created a gigantic need for another type, digital signal processing chips, designed to enhance photography, for example.

Source: How Chip Designers Are Breaking Moore's Law - WSJ